Despite the Snow, Amanda DeLeon Dominated NYC Fashion Week as the “Designer to Watch”

Despite the Snow, Amanda DeLeon Dominated NYC Fashion Week as the “Designer to Watch”

Art comes in many different forms. It can be a beautiful painting or an interesting sculpture. Quite frankly, I consider the unnerving novel or gut-wrenching poem to be the same. Unfortunately, most don’t consider fashion as an art because all they see are the models, not what they’re wearing; focused on all the trends and not the talent. They have no idea how designers work diligently for months and into the night before a show to make sure everything is perfect, as most artists do. What art truly does is move you. It makes your heart skip a beat and say, “I just have to have it.” Fashion designers can do the same, given the chance when trends are disregarded. Classic is best because it’s something you can wear year after year that never goes out of style; clean lines and exquisite craftsmanship define the true artist in fashion.

Madison Massey from Major Model Agency -- originally from Lafayette -- awaits her turn patiently.
Madison Massey from Major Model Agency -- originally from Lafayette -- awaits her turn patiently.

Many international names have it but at this particular moment, there is a wonderfully talented designer in NoLa who rules the runway. She’s a slim girl with red hair with big ideas and she had her first show at NYC Fashion Week last Thursday. Despite almost a foot of snow, Amanda deleon managed to fill the Algonquin Hotel with interested viewers and expertly execute a show that would make any well-known designer jealous. NolaWoman was there with photographer Christian Padron trudging through the snow to take us a behind the scenes and on the runway look at Amanda’s Fall 2014 looks.

Amanda displays her humbleness by ironing her designs for the show.
Amanda displays her humbleness by ironing her designs for the show.

She aptly names it LaNouvelle-Orléans with music from John Boutté and Paul Sanchez’s song, Foot of Canal Street and her pieceswere constructed of wools, leathers, silks and fringe. De Leon talked about her inspitation for the line. "The cemeteries of New Orleans are so beautiful and rich with architecture. They are an undeniable staple in the city’s history and culture. After musing over the idea of a New Orleans burial, my line developed based on feelings and experiences of, not only death, but also my struggles with religion, depression and anxiety. Essentially, it is a collection based on what I would want people to wear to my own funeral."

The buzz behind the scenes before the models hit the runway.
The buzz behind the scenes before the models hit the runway.

"Showing at NYFW is really a way of getting my foot in the door to prove that I have something that is special and valid to the fashion industry. Us Southerners tend to get looked over or scoffed at because we don't have innovation in other aspects of our culture. But the South, undoubtedly, has a plethora of creativity and it is deserving of the same level of respect given to designers in so called fashion cities," said deLeon. "I had the pleasure of teaming up with some amazing companies and artists to complete my looks and presentation. I worked with Gregory Patterson of Blow Pro, Kim D’Amato of Priti NYC, Dr Martins, Lamography Camera Company, The Algonquin Hotel team, Thea Grant Jewelry, Bite Cosmetics, and Bitch Bubbly champagne.

Below (in addition to all photos) are some shots from the show, exclusively taken by Manhattan photographer, Christian Padron:

Amanda making last minute adjustments.
Amanda making last minute adjustments.
 

Serious about what she does, Amanda leaves no stone unturned.
Serious about what she does, Amanda leaves no stone unturned.

Doc Marten was the shoe sponsor for Amanda's show.
Doc Marten was the shoe sponsor for Amanda's show.

The Collection on display at the Algonquin.
The Collection on display at the Algonquin.

Her smile means a show well done.
Her smile means a show well done.

Celebrating after the show.
Celebrating after the show.